Social Media, Advertising … and You

Lois Martin Marketing, advertisting, social mediaThis is chat guest post is by Lois Martin (@loismarketing), longtime KaizenBiz community member and marketing and public relations advisor for small to mid-sized businesses. Based in Atlanta, Georgia, Lois provides strategic planning, social media management, graphic design and copywriting services.

Two or three weeks ago I became involved in a “side” conversation with fellow Tweeps during the #KaizenBiz chat. The conversation caught Elli’s attention – along with several others – and resulted in my landing in the guest seat (or should I say “the hot seat”???) for this week’s chat.

It’s interesting to discover business – and discuss business – from many angles during our time together each week. What is most interesting is when the topic of advertising or marketing arises. In the “side” conversation the other week it became clear that many of you are frustrated with what you view as intrusive, disrupting and interrupting advertising in social media. So … let’s discuss!

The best things in life AREN’T free!

If we admit it, all of us have been spoiled by the proliferation of free applications, free tools and other freeware on the Internet. When you stop and think about them, each has been a form of advertising or marketing for its creator. Many of these “freebies” stand on their own and support themselves – but such is no longer the case for major social media such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Highly-secured server farms and highly-skilled staff cost thousands of dollars to build, maintain and expand as the popularity of social media grows.

Will that be cash or credit?

Trust me – I’m right there with you. I find advertising disruptive and aggravating at times too.

Many of you who participate in #Kaizenbiz know that I am a Formula 1 racing fan. Nothing bugs me more than commercial breaks during the live broadcast of a race. Invariably, a key overtake (AKA “pass”) or another moment for the history books takes place during those crucial three minutes. I can hear all of you saying “Grrrr …” with me! We’ve all been there. Sometimes we are not afforded the luxury of split-screen action or timeouts on the field to allow for Kelloggs, CocaCola, McDonald’s, Honda et al  – who foot the bill for our entertainment.

Hmmmm. When you think about it that way, maybe those commercials aren’t so bad after all. Agreed? Yes, we pay for cable, satellite or other digital subscriptions – but how much would it cost you if the advertisers WEREN’T there?

We now return you to our regular programming …

So here we are back at our topic: social media and advertising. Elli, your fellow #Kaizenbiz chatters and I look forward to your hearing what you have to say – or tweet.

Join us Friday, June 7th at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT on Twitter (use the hashtag #KaizenBiz) and add your insights and expertise to this conversation:

In using major social media – Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn – do you think that paid advertising displays or posts disrupt your experience? If so, how?

Have you, your company or your clients purchased advertising in social media? If so, what were the results or outcome?

 Would you prefer to pay for a subscription to social media as an alternative to viewing or reading advertisements? If so, what would be a reasonable monthly fee for Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn?

 Who has been the most effective with advertising in social media?  Have you purchased a product or service as a result of a social media ad or “page”?

 What are your thoughts about targeted advertising in social media? Do you find it intrusive – or smart?

About the author: Lois Martin is a marketing and public relations advisor for small to mid-sized businesses. Based in Atlanta, Georgia, Lois provides strategic planning, social media management, graphic design and copywriting services. Lois’ clients include a number of retail, financial, motor sports and specialty contractor companies. For more information, contact her at Lois (at) loismarketing (dot) com

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