Open Letter to the KaizenBiz Community

Dear KaizenBiz Community,

It is with some sadness that I write this open letter. So many of you have participated and listened to our conversations on Twitter. Since I took over the chat four years ago, it has been an honor and a privilege facilitating the online chat, finding interesting topics and introducing guests. As you may remember, the mission of the chat was/is to apply critical thinking, enhance our skills and deepen our self-understanding in a kaizen (incremental steps) sort of way as we gathered each week. However, it seems we have reached an end of a chapter.

Explored so many business topics and ideas

Over the last four years we have discussed various topics such as

There are many more topics ranging from leadership, branding, influence that are worth reading and taking the time to consider.

Our guests

We have had such interesting guests over the years that deserve our thanks for taking the time to present their ideas and engage with us as we applied critical thinking. Here are the guests who added so much to our knowledge and understanding:

It is with deep appreciation that I thank each and every one of our guests for the time they put into writing the framing post for their topic as well as being live on the Twitter chat.

Special thanks to the team

Over the last four years, there have been a few people who have helped make the chat work. First and foremost, a special thank you to CASUDI (also known as Caroline Di Diego). CASUDI has been an advocate and inspiration. There have been times when I could not be physically present for the chat and Judy Gombita and Lois Martin were able to substitute as chat hosts. Many thanks for your generosity and high level of competence! Bernd Nurnberger contributed by setting up our LinkedIn page where we can still connect. Many thanks to Cathryn Hrudicka for sharing each and every post on her blog. Her generosity and support is deeply appreciated. Many thanks to another avid supporter is Eric Bryson who helped announce the chat each week. Finally, a grateful recognition to Cathy Larkin who has been my right hand person as well as tech and Twitter chat advisor.

To a talented and brilliant community

Over the last couple of years, our community has changed due to many members becoming busier in their careers. While it is great to see so many deserving professionals becoming more successful, we miss their warmth, insight and expertise on the chat. You, the community, have been excellent participants in taking a deeper dive into all kinds of topics. Due to your intelligence and curiosity, I found myself learning about economics, holacracy and so many other topics. Besides meeting people that I am delighted to know, KaizenBiz has deepened my own skills and knowledge. It has been a joy to have people from Japan, India, Africa, Portugal, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Colombia, Mexico and the United States sharing their expertise, insight and opinions on so many topics.

That said, over the last six months, attendance on our weekly chat on Twitter has dwindled to just a handful of people. With that in mind, it seems time to put the chat on an indefinite hiatus.

Let’s stay connected

While the conversations may not be as regular as meeting each week on Twitter, it is still possible to remain connected and share ideas in our LinkedIn group. I also suggest that if you find or write an article that is the thought provoking type that we would discuss on one of our #KaizenBiz chats, that you post it on Twitter and feel free to use the chat hashtag. I hope you will reach out and let me know your thoughts about putting the chat on a hiatus due to low attendance. You can always connect with me via my website or on LinkedIn.

As of this Friday, 26 September 2014, we will not meet on Twitter.

My best wishes for your success, keep thinking and developing your skills and you!

Elli

 

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KaizenBiz-What’s On Your Summer Reading List?

KaizenBiz, Tom Asacker, summer reading, booksWith the slower pace of summer days upon us (although some of the KaizenBiz readers are in winter), you might be thinking about those books you have been meaning to read. As for me, I’m looking at a copy of Resonant leadership : Renewing Yourself and Connecting With Others Through Mindfulness, Hope, and Compassion by Richard Boyatzis. While it is always interesting to read the newest books, sometimes we  have to go back to already-existing list and pick one of those titles.

Speaking of the newest books…

Every year on Small Business Trends, there is a business book contest and the books cover a variety of topics. Here are a few that caught my eye:

Number Sense: How To Use Big Data To Your Advantage by Kaiser Fung- Fung has put a book together that explains  how to look at Big Data and figure out when it is really bad data…or useful

Innovation: How Innovators Think, Act and Change Our World by Kim Chandler McDonald- This is for all the #KaizenFolk who get jazzed about innovation. The books contains interviews with innovators from around the world and shares insights and encouragement.

Culture Without Accountability – WTF? What’s the Fix? by Julie Miller and Brian Bedford- As a big fan of accountability, this book caught my eye. Miller and Bedford put forth a process that supports a company putting an accountability system in place and what could happen without it.

The Business Of Belief: How the World’s Best Marketers, Designers, Salespeople, Coaches, Fundraisers, Educators, Entrepreneurs and Other Leaders Get Us To Believe by Tom Asacker- Since Tom Asacker is one of our KaizenBiz community members, it is good to highlight his sixth book. If you’ve been with us on the chat, Asacker has shared his insights and perspectives so take a look at his book, get more than 140 characters.and discover your assumptions about leadership and how influence works.

Some suggestions from LeadershipNow.com

This site is a great source of books for anyone interested in leadership. Every month, they have a list of books that they recommend. Here a few from the last months:

The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials Into Triumph by Ryan Holiday- We all experience adversity and often look for a way to handle it. Holiday presents how using the philosophy of Stoicism can be a tool for overcoming adversity and achieving success.

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown- Lots of us talk about having too much to do and too little time. McKeown’s perspective is that we need to follow The Way of Essentialism and do less but create more quality in our lives.

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces Forces That Stand In the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace- Catmull is one of the co-founders of Pixar Animation Studios as well as co-writer of this book which focuses on the process Pixar used to create unforgettable animation. Catmull and Wallace explain how companies can use the same creativity process.

These are the ones that caught my eye. What’s on your list for summer reading? Join us on the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz on Friday, June 27, 2014 and share your recommendations.

How do you choose a “work” book to read? 

What one thing have you learned from a book that moves your business/work forward daily?

What books are you reading right now?

What books are you looking forward to reading over the summer?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Headline Convo – Gender Pay Gaps, Resume is Dead and CEO Pay

KaizenBiz , Twitter chat,This week is our monthly “Bring Your Own Headline” discussion. This conversation is usually much more wide ranging and even better when someone from the KaizenBiz community shares something that caught their attention. What are you reading or viewing that made you stop and think? This week, we are going to move from topic to topic and see what big ideas are popping up. So, check out these stories and bring your own this Friday to the live Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz at 4pm GMT/12pm ET/9am.

Women entrepreneurs pay themselves less?

We often think of how entrepreneurship can be totally designed by the individual entrepreneur. He or she can designate their hours, their rate of pay and the products and services that are offered. Arecent Babson College study discovered that women entrepreneurs pay themselves approximately 80% of their male counterparts. While the study does not explain why this occurs, it seems rather interesting that there is a gap.

It is easy to focus on the US since this conversation about salary gaps has been going on for some time. It even made a mention in the 2014 State of the Union address by President Obama. However, there is a bigger picture. There is gender wage gap all over the world (here is an infographic from Time). While there are some who will argue that it has everything to do with the types of businesses women found. After all, some work is valued more than other work. There is always the argument that women take time off from work due to family obligations. Still, there are questions about what the disparities mean in real life.

What are the possible business reasons women entrepreneurs pay themselves less?

How does looking at men’s pay as the standard skew our perceptions of what are appropriate salaries?

If we make the picture more global, what sorts of socioeconomic reasons exist for women entrepreneurs to pay themselves less?

Just when you thought job hunting could not get more complicated

There are always reports that something is “dead.” Now it is the resume (or the CV, curriculum vitae) that is passe. With the global economy growing (albeit sluggishly), many companies are hiring new staff. While this Forbes post is self-serving the author, he does point out how different things have become in the job hunt. With potential employers looking at social media, search engines and in-person networking, the resume simply confirms information about you. This certainly puts the resume fairly low in importance. Interestingly, in a post by BlueGlue (a managed recruitment service firm based in the UK), the cv is described as less important than the online information and digital portfolios. If the resume and the cv are being phased out, this may become a stumbling block for many job seekers.

How much weight do recruiters and human resources professionals put on resumes/ cv’s versus online information?

If resumes and cv’s are less important, what social ramifications are there for job seekers?

LinkedIn is mentioned as a resource for both job seekers and recruiters. To what degree is this social media site used around the world?

 The relationship between CEO pay and performance

Periodically, there is a conversation about CEO pay. There are often huge gaps between what the CEO is paid compared to others in the company. Another area that gets people talking is how CEOs are never really punished for failing as they get golden parachutes. The connection between these two conversations is whether or not there really is a relationship between CEO pay and performance.

It certainly seems that CEOs of large companies are much like the manager or head coach of a sports team. When things are going well, the CEO is praised and when things are going badly, well, the CEO is at fault. They are paid very high salaries which makes one wonder if they truly have the skills to merit such a reward and do they really matter that much to their organizations.

Gilles Hilary, INSEAD Associate Professor of Accounting & Control, states that CEOs do bring quite a lot of value to their organizations. In a HKUST Business School study, they discovered that if there is good governance and strong shareholder rights, CEO compensation is a good predictor of success. But as Rick Wartzmann asked in his Forbes post, how do you define performance? There is a temptation to aim for increased revenues and profits but that could result in undermining the long term health of the company, discouraging innovation or weakening the overall vision and strategy of the company.

What criteria must a CEO meet in order to be described as performing well?

How is the pay of CEOs of smaller organizations tied to performance?

To what degree are CEOs involved with the actual performance of the company?

 Time for your suggestions

The above topics are my suggestions for our lighting roundtable discussion on the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz. If something caught your attention this week, bring it the discussion on Friday, March 21, 2014 at 4pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT. Remember to include the link and even  one or two discussion questions

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Useful Procrastination, Satya Nadella and Holacracy

Twitter, Twitter chat, KaizenBizIt is time for “Bring Your Own Headline” on our Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz this coming Friday. It is always fun to see what community members bring for discussion. If you would like to bring something for us to talk about, simply bring the link and a question. Here are three topics, procratination, Satya Nadella and holacracy, to get us started…

Procrastination is good?

Most of us probably squirm a bit when we think of tasks we are avoiding.However, according to a two books reviewed in Fast Company, we would be much better off if we did procrastinate more. There is a catch to this though. If you are just procrastinating without a purpose, the books’ authors agree that this is laziness. Both Frank Partnoy and John Perry recommend “structure procrastination.” Here are their reasons why procrastination can be useful:

  • Structured procrastinators get more done. While they put off one task, they complete others.
  • Procrastinator make better decisions. During the delay, there is more time to think through the options and gather information.
  • Procrastination leads to creativity. A task that is too hard to complete might need a different process.
  • Unnecessary tasks disappear. Busy work is pointless and avoiding it allows for space to take on the important tasks.
  • Procrastination leads to better apologies. Again, time to think is built into the delay and then the best words can be found.
  • Procrastination gives you insight. Sometimes we put things off because we have an unconscious reason driving our behavior. The delay can illuminate this unconscious reason.

When do you see procrastination as being useful?

How is procrastination connected to decision fatigue and difficulty maintaining self-control?

With procrastination, are we really seeking time to think with putting off tasks?

Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s new CEO

With Steve Ballmer stepping down this month, there is a new CEO for Microsoft. Satya Nadella. Before Ballmer stepped down, he had announced that Microsoft would go in a new direction. Ballmer is certainly noted for his ebullient personality With the choice of Satya Nadella,  Nadella is known as a quiet but business-savvy person with a strong engineering background. Quite a number of people describe Nadella as inclusive and able to get people engaged and excited in their work. It will be interesting to see how Microsoft not only responds to the current market but introduces its own new ideas.

Why do you suppose Microsoft chose to go with Satya Nadella rather than someone similar to Steve Ballmer?

What’s next for Microsoft?

And just what is holacracy?

Just when you thought you had a good grasp of the latest business structure terms, here comes a new one. Holacracy is “a self-governing, purpose-driven business structure that reassigns authority and responsibility based on the task at hand.” Companies that are able to respond positively to the current marketplace need to be agile and use collaboration among other tools.

This business structure has no CEO or managers. Each person is a partner with complete autonomy and authority. On Holacracy One, they write, “Everyone becomes a leader of their roles and a follower of others’, processing tensions with real authority and real responsibility, through dynamic governance and transparent operations.” This is to encourage project ownership and accountability instead of keeping people limited to their departments or skill set. Governance of organizations that use holacracy have a more democratic approach to make decisions, respond to “tension” and design rules to contain certain personalities from dominating the whole. Data is used actively in strategic planning and decision-making.

What size organization could benefit the most from using holacracy as their business structure?

What sorts of advantages do  you see for organizations that do use holacracy?

What could be the disadvantages?

Now it’s your turn

Join us on the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz, this Friday, February 7, 2014 at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT with a post that caught your attention this week. Connect with Elli St.George Godfrey (@3keyscoach) jas the chat starts and let her know your link and your question. She will add your topic to the discussion.

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Global Growth, Emotional Awareness & Productivity

KaizenBiz , Twitter chat, One of the recent introductions to the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz in 2013 has been the “Bring Your Own Headline” discussion. This conversation is usually much more wide ranging and even better when someone from the KaizenBiz community shares something that caught their attention. Have you come across any interesting posts or new stories that make you stop and think? This week, we are going to move from topic to topic and see what big ideas are popping up. So, check out these stories and bring your own this Friday to the live Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am.

Better global economy?

There have been glimmers from regional economies that growth is occurring. Ireland exited the bailout last week and other parts of the Eurozone are showing fractional improvement. The Japanese economy is looking better. While economists are more positive, they are not saying it’s entirely bullish.

What observations have you made regarding the economy where you are located?

How are different sectors responding to the economic news?

What is same/different about this economic recovery?

 Being able to read organization’s emotions can improve odds of success?

There are probably leaders all over the world who just don’t get “it.” In the US, President Obama’s approval rating and the exit of Steve Ballmer as CEO of Microsoft are good examples of how that emotional stuff can interfere with any strategic plan, no matter how well thought out or designed it might be. As Quy Huy, INSEAD Associate Professor of Strategy and Director of the Strategy Execution Programme, wrote in his post,  many executives “fail to…take into account the hidden traps related to soft human factors, including the collective emotions of middle managers and others who influence the process of strategy execution and have a critical impact on the outcomes.”

Steve Tobak recommends in his Inc post that we should ignore emotional intelligence because it is a business fad. (Although this fad seems to be going on for decades now) He cites a list of leaders who are not known for being kind or compassionate but their companies are successful. Tobak and many others show an oversimplification in their understanding of emotional intelligence. It still doesn’t answer why leaders ignore the zeigeist of their company while following the strategic plan. Quy Huy’s point about ignoring emotions reminds us that people will express in their behavior their willingness to execute or derail any plan.

What fosters the disconnect between upper management, middle management and the workers?

While models like Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg are touted as successful examples, why do people continue to fail to execute strategic plans?

Does an emotionally intelligent leader have to seem “nice” or can there be other expressions of awareness?

Productivity

We all have lots to do. As my good friend, Kneale Mann reminds me, we all have the same 24 hours each day as everyone else (including all those famous people). There are always posts telling us what highly successful (read “highly productive”) people do with their day. There are reports that our productivity rises or falls depending on where, when and how we do our work. However, it seems to boil down to our daily choices and habits.

One of these habits has to do with email. In an interesting post on Fast Company, Laura Vanderkam discusses the pros and cons of checking email first thing in the morning. Reading and responding to email can certainly use up time we meant for other activities. MIndset certainly plays a role in this. Seth Godin suggests that we become productive when we are “non-productivity and deciding to do something that matters, right now.”

How is productivity different from efficiency?

What expectations do people have about their workload or daily schedule?

How do we buy into the idea that we are so busy that our productivity is hampered?

Please join us Friday, December 20, 2013 on the Twittter chat, #KaizenBiz at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT as we take a look at these and other topics. Bring your own suggestions and a question.

 

 

 

 

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Where Is Business Going in 2014?

Business trends of 2014, robotics, video, social business, KaizenBizAs one year ends, it is always interesting to see what people anticipate coming in the next year. On LinkedIn, there is an interesting group of posts from business thinkers and leaders giving their suggestions about what we might see. As you might expect, some of the trends are built on technology or ideas started in earlier years while others are potentially new ways of engaging with the world. The interesting thing to discover over 2014 will whether these trends are more like an unfolding or truly transformative.

What is coming next?

On our Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz and elsewhere, there has been so much talk about the uncertainty and rapid change which has made many business owners and executives reluctant to invest, hire or embark on growth projects. There is always that optimism that somehow things will be more understandable or predictable in a new year. It may be that 2014 might be an interesting year as people and companies decide to take action because sitting still will leave them too far behind.

Here are some of the trends and ideas that could gain traction in 2014:

  • 3D Printing- This one seems pretty obvious since there is a great deal of excitement around 3D printing. Mike Michalowicz, CEO of the Provendus Group writes in OPEN Forum that these printers will come down in price and make it easier for companies to produce on demand. There are some thinkers who believe that this will change manufacturing and even allow for greater customizing of products.
  • Robotics- This has been an interesting area over the years and as Verne Harnish writes on CNN Money that more widespread use of robots will reduce headcount in manufacturing and increase productivity.
  • Video- This trend seemed to emerge in 2013 but is becoming more favored. Interesting statistics about how and what people view. Google and search engines appear to be giving more weight to video content
  • Emerging markets- While the BRIC nations and other emerging markets are slowing, an EY report and Barron’s suggest that these might be places of growth later in 2014. In fact, there is some discussion that people should watch Indonesia and Africa.
  • Social business- With the IPO of Twitter in late 2013 and the ongoing public performance of Facebook, social business has shown it can be more than a fad. According to Clara Shih, CEO of Hearsay and author of The Facebook Era, social business will cement itself as a tool that all companies use and support the relational trend in marketing and sales.

 Where do you think business is going in 2014?

Whether you agree with the writers of the LinkedIn 2014 predictions or the other posts cited here, it is always interesting to stop and see what is emerging (or even lurking) in the months ahead. And there are lots more predictions about the future of marketing, leadership, the workplace, the global economy and many other aspects of business.

What do you see staying the same? Changing? Or simply being brand new? Join us this Friday, December 6, 2013 at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT on the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz as we peer into the future of 2014.

What trends of 2013 surprised you?

What didn’t happen in 2013?

Which 2014 business trends are expanding on ideas or trends from 2013?

What is the most unusual 2014 business trend that you have heard?

What business trends for 2014 do you see gaining traction?

 

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Is Culture Orange and Bitcoin a Bad Investment?

Have you come across any interesting posts or new stories that make you stop and think? Often I find so many interesting business topics that it is hard to choose which one to focus on for the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz. However, this week we are going to borrow from those talk shows that move from topic to topic and see what big ideas are popping up. So, check out these stories and bring your own this Friday to the live Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am

What is culture really about?

Orange? Really? In a post on Fast Company, the focus is on Avalara which is a sales-tax assisting company. Tax compliance is certainly not the most shiny or sexy thing you could do and Scott McFarlane readily acknowledges that and sales tax? Well, for some people, it is a lot of work keeping track of the various rates in various locales around the world. According to their site, Avalara takes care of the accounting and filing.

It is certainly not some crazy cool techology or even a remarkable social idea but they found something that communicates who they are with the color orange. When all is said and done, communicating culture is about symbols. The use of certain colors, offering perks to employees (game rooms, yoga classes, monetary incentives, etc.) and corporate behavior are symbols that communicate the organizational story.

Has Bitcoin peaked?

Bitcoin is an intriguing idea. Given how much of our life is spent in the digital world, it seems to follow that there would be a virtual currency. There are certainly groups of people who would be interested in a form of money that could not be tracked or taxed. On the other hand, you do need real money to buy Bitcoins and then there are limited places (even the illegal ones) that will accept this virtual currency. The Atlantic has an explanation as to why you should stay away from Bitcoin altogether.

Bitcoin presents some interesting points. There are a limit of Bitcoins and there will be no more Bitcoins after 2040. Unlike most conventional currencies, Bitcoins are supposed to increase in value because there is only so much of it. According to The Atlantic, the Winkelvoss twins have filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission  “to launch an exchange-traded-fund (ETF) that would trade like a stock, and track the price of Bitcoin — and only Bitcoin.” The post goes on to point out that there are some problems with investing in Bitcoin with the Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust:

  • it is a volatile currency
  • the Trust could be hacked and all your investment could disappear
  • there is illegal and undesirable activity paid for by Bitcoin (drugs and pornography) which is generally avoided by mainstream investors

There may be another issue with Bitcoin not noted in The Atlantic post and that is that Thailand declared the virtual currency illegal. It seems pretty obvious that there are plenty of questions to ask about Bitcoin and the idea of a virtual currency.

What headlines have caught your attention?

So, here is your invitation to bring an interesting blog post or news story to the chat. The culture and Bitcoin topics are just conversation starters. Join  us Friday, August 2, 2013 at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT as we look at interesting topics from around the web.

Culture:

How do companies communicate their culture?

Is it more important to communicate your culture internally or externally? Why or why not?

To what degree do customers really care about your corporate culture?

 

Bitcoin:

How does a virtual currency fit into the current global economy?

How valid are the concerns put forth in The Atlantic post?

What is your analysis of Bitcoin’s future performance and/or value?

 

 

 

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What’s All the Fuss About Innovation?

Why are there so many posts about innovation? Perhaps it is due to the new year. Or maybe even because it is touted as the answer to rebooting the economy. Or maybe it is because we don’t understand innovation. Rosabeth Moss Kanter, in Nine Rules For Stifling Innovation, sums up the fuss,

Innovation has become the holy grail. Finding innovation is almost a sacred quest for the solution that will create growth, and open new eras of prosperity and well-being.
Unfortunately, like many things called holy, the concept of innovation is invoked ritually and ceremonially more than it is embraced in practice.

Basic definition

According to BusinessDictionary.com, the definition of innovation is “the process of translating an idea or invention to a good or service that creates value for which customers will pay.”

Join us for the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz on Friday, January 18, 2013 at 5pm GMT/12pm ET/9am PT and discuss what we make such a fuss about innovation. Not sure how to participate? Please click here for tips and advice.

The $1,000,000 (approximately €748,223) question

Continue reading

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KaizenBiz Celebrates With Goal Setting for 2013

Celebrating KaizenBiz community members, goal settingAs the year ends and a new one is on the horizon, it’s time to stop and celebrate the good stuff that happened. And just as naturally, it’s good to consider what goals  you want to achieve next.

*Please join us Friday, December 21st at 5pm BST/12pm ET/9am PT for the Twitter chat, #KaizenBiz as we celebrate with goal setting. Not sure how to participate? Please click here for tips and advice.

To get the celebration started, I asked members of the Kaizen Biz community to share their success stories. Since we have members from a variety of places, I included where they are based. Continue reading

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Support KaizenBiz With a (Virtual) Latte

This guest post is written by #KaizenBiz community member and sponsor, CASUDI (also known as Caroline Di Diego). CASUDI is a long-standing member of the chat who many of you have connected with online and offline. She explains how to support KaizenBiz and why your support will make this endeavour more valuable to you, the community.

We ALL want to support!

So many of us are really committed to our Friday east coast lunchtime chat, #kaizenbiz However we need to support our chat just one little tiny bit more.

A Virtual Latte?

Let’s buy a virtual latte for our leader @3Keyscoach and let’s support #KaizenBiz, better yet let’s support the community and buy one every week or at least whenever we join the chat!

What does a virtual latte cost? How do I buy it?

Buying a $5.00 virtual latte is simple and easy ~ “all you need is a PayPal account or credit card and to select the donate button here or in the side bar.”


Virtual Latte Support




This is the kind of Latte I mean…

Support KaizenBiz with a Virtual Latte

Now comes the important WHY? 

#Kaizenbiz is an online community providing ongoing quality content for each chat and this costs time and money. Time has been a donated commodity so far by Elli and Cathy mostly and a very little bit by me.

Behind the scenes

There is an amazing amount of behind the scenes work to keep a successful chat going, as some of you have found out when you guest host, and what is more we have been going for three and a half years, which is one of the longest running for any twitter chat.

How will the virtual latte be used?

  • Web hosting & development
  • Chat transcript services and time (Storify,TweetReports, Hashtracking)
  • Apps &Tools like BufferApp

Supports our editorial freedom

Our chat and website is based on the idea that we apply critical thinking to business ideas so we continuously improve. As each topic is researched and guests are recruited, we get to explore both the ideas and ourselves.

Elli noted,

 “In a recent conversation, several participants expressed reservations about having a chat sponsor who might be inclined to direct the chat in only their direction. This could diminish the quality and value of the chat”

KaizenBiz would of course embrace a Larger sponsor(s) but Elli is committed to maintaining the quality of our chat and will not take on a sponsor who is not aligned with the goals of the community or who will change the content (or essence) of our chat.

 This is your opportunity to give back!

Wouldn’t you really be up for taking Elli or Cathy or me out for a latte break every Friday?  That’s not even the cost of lunch and your virtual latte can really make a difference to the #kaizenbiz community!

So, I came up with the latte support. A $5 virtual latte donation for the chat – just to help maintain the value we have and provide sustenance for the chat going into the future?”

What does our community think of this?

What do you think about this and do you have any other ideas on how to support our chat?Comments below if you are inclined? Best of all, please Donate a virtual latte! I am donating as well as asking, but this is of course absolutely optional and you are always very welcome at the chat.

About the author: CASUDI (Caroline Di Diego) is an active KaizenBiz member since July 2009.

CASUDI is a multi-faceted entrepreneur with parallel careers. In the one she focuses on Architectural  & Landscaping Design solutions and the other (where most of you know her) she does what it takes to move start up & early-stage companies, from “concept” or “chaos” to fundable and/or profitable.

She has designed & produced award winning television film documentaries, corporate marketing and product videos and television commercials. Storytelling is her thing

She mentors small business and says “we all learn!”

Photo by CASUDI, Latte by Danielle at Vois café Seattle

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